Managing Disruptive Leadership for Success & Workplace Wellness…

by | Nov 13, 2021

Trust is at the center of workplace wellness…

Trust is everything, not just something we give a passing thought to. When there is no trust, the well-being of persons suffer…

In organizations, it’s the same, more than anywhere else in my experience. Without trust in each other organizational cultures typically fail miserably, and the bottom line starts to look like a fire fight with no escape…

People start to leave or do not want to show up. It becomes extremely difficult to recruit good people.

Recruiters shy away from a business with questionable reputations. These organizations are not healthy places to hang out or thrive in your work or passion to make a difference…

So, what do you do as a leader when dysfunction consumes the culture? What is the first step? How can you, as a CEO rebuild trust and get back to good health and a path to a thriving team, a happy, healthy and successful mission?

Although it’s a tough move to hire a professional engaged in organizational change. Someone who makes a living doing this difficult task is a tough recruiting effort, especially a professional with a successful track record of success…

Who would even want to do this kind of leadership role? Let’s take a look at the profile of the ideal disruptive leader…

From https://www.elevatecorporatetraining.com.au/

The 7 Traits Of Disruptive Leaders

For disruptive leaders, it isn’t about change for the sake of change. It’s about increasing value through change. Disruptive leaders typically share these seven traits:

Fearless

  1. They are fearless in pursuing the truth. They are constantly testing products, services, and strategies against where the market is heading, and they aren’t afraid to tell people when things aren’t working.
  2. They are decisive and inspire confidence. Teams want leaders that see the future and lead them where they need to go. Disruptive leaders are able to articulate their vision of the future and break down the steps needed to meet that vision.
  3. They are adaptable. When disruptive ideas don’t work, they move on. Even the best disruptive thinking may fall short when markets shift or new information comes to light. They don’t see failure as an end result, but an opportunity to learn what does not work in order to find what does work.
  4. They are often life-long learners. They have a nearly insatiable interest in a multitude of topics and often find insight and inspiration in unexpected places. They constantly ask why and why not. They seek counsel from colleagues and accept coaching and training.
  5. They understand that disruption can cause uncertainty for team members. Amid chaos, they keep everybody focused on the job at hand. In times of change, they are comfortable with uncertainty. 

Customer focused mindset is predominant…

  1. They are customer-obsessed and product-obsessed. They focus on making better products that will solve customer problems and find efficiencies to reduce costs. They are rarely satisfied and constantly looking for the next revision.
  2. They are rule breakers by nature. Disruptive leaders have a healthy skepticism of past practices. They approach tasks looking for ways to improve.

The path forward…

If you desire to explore this topic further, please reach out to me, and others you know. Start the conversation. This is a big deal, believe me…

Steve and Judy Sparks
Children and Families in Life After Trauma

My Blog

Stories and Memories

Running Away From PTSD…

Running Away From PTSD…

https://www.foxnews.com/politics/one-time-rising-star-jason-kander-won-battle-ptsd-return-politics Running 24/7! Running from intrusive thoughts and demons all my life is a horrific mental health challenge, in my view. And, I’m not alone. Millions of people suffer…

About the author

Steve Sparks is a retired information technology sales and marketing executive with over 35 years of industry experience, including a Bachelors’ in Management from St. Mary’s College. His creative outlet is as a non-fiction author, writing about his roots as a post-WWII US Navy military child growing up in the 1950s-1960s.
View all posts by Steve →

You might also like

Translate »