Pete ‘n Patty Piper ‘n Pals Sing at Moolack Dunes… “Let It Be!”

Sandpipers hang ‘n fly at Moolack Dunes

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sandpiper

As I walked gingerly down the path to Moolack Dunes, I heard “Pete ‘n Patty Piper sing. They both were singing a song I heard before, but can’t remember who sang it from way back when… Maybe “Let it Be” by the Beatles always comes to mind as I listen to them…

As I turned the corner to walk out the the edge of the water where Pete ‘n Patty Piper were singing as I watched the rest of the clan fly up quickly, then return. Sandpipers do that when we get to close…

But not Pete and Patty Piper. Both know I’m a friend. They also know I love to listen to them sing into the wind and waves. It’s like they both were there for a afternoon concert on the beach…

Sandpipers have four feeding different styles to observe with fun. The first is pecking and probing in the sand next to the water’s edge. “Peck, peck, peck, & tic, tak, tok,” I thought, while watching them…

The second, and most frequent, method employed is probing soft soils, muds and sands for prey.

The third, used by Tringa shanks, involves running in shallow water with the bill under the water chasing fish, a method that uses sight as well as tactile senses.

The final method, employed by some sandpipers, involves pecking at the water for small prey.[6] To some extent, taking seeds and shoots as well as invertebrates as delights of the day…

Sandpipers Nest near the shore…

Most Sandpipers nest in open areas, and defend their territories with aerial displays, and singing no doubt, I believe. The nest itself is a simple scrape in the ground, in which the bird typically lays three or four eggs.

In species where only a single parent incubates the eggs, it’s double duty 24/7. During the night the parent sits on the eggs nearly continuously. Then, during the warmest part of a day, leaves the nest for short feeding bouts.[9] 

The tiny Chicks hatch after about three weeks of incubation. They are able to walk and forage within a few hours of hatching. A single parent or both parents guide and brood the chicks.[6]

I hope you enjoyed this short journey to Moolack Dunes as much as I did. I learned some things about Sandpipers I didn’t know before…

Hanging out with Pete ‘n Patty Piper was the most fun. I love the Beatles song “Let it Be.” I know the Pipers sing that song every time go there. They sing it just for me…

Steve and Judy Sparks
Children and Families in Life After Trauma (CFLAT)
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